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Friday, February 03, 2006
 
Catholic students honor parents, have fun

St. Paul's Grade School students trooped up and down hallways in baseball caps, stocking caps, fedoras and Stetsons. Some even wore colorful top hats that made them look like Dr. Suess characters. The hats were symbols of appreciation - not a new dress code for the Catholic school. The kids wore them Thursday on the fourth day of Catholic Schools Week to honor the hard work of some of the school's most important champions: its parents. After a special all-school assembly that honored three parents - Jim Hahne, Denise Fisher and Deb Kiley - for their extra effort on the school's behalf, students continued special activities designed to celebrate Catholic Schools Week. Fifth-graders Katie Bateman and Ella Black stood outside a display case filled with black-and-white baby pictures of teachers. Students tried to match the pictures with names of faculty members. The two found their teacher, Barbara Lattyak, and another teacher, Debbie Lavery, who posed with Santa Claus when she was a small child. Bateman and Black said they were proud of their parents who serve on the athletic board. "He helps put together the games and stuff," Black said, referring to her father. The two girls soon were joined by their classmate Jesse Hahne, whose dad was honored earlier in the day. Hahne said his dad was one of those responsible for raising funds for the school's new gym floor. In the gym, eighth-graders practiced for today's annual volleyball game against the faculty. Students practiced setting and serves, diving across the floor in scrimmage. Sara Carnaghi said the whole school looks forward to the game each year. "You can express yourself. Everybody has fun," she said. Carnaghi and her friend, Marissa Watson, said the entire week has been a bit of a break. Some normal school activities were suspended for special celebrations, such as the countywide assembly at Schlarman High School on Monday. All Catholic schools in the county attended. "We don't have any homework this week, but we still learn," Carnaghi said. On Tuesday, St. Paul's celebrated the 50th anniversary of the school. Wednesday was Student Appreciation Day, which the school celebrated by taking all students to Illini Skateland, where they played laser tag. The two eighth-graders seemed to be most excited about the volleyball game, though. "Everybody goes crazy. We wear torn-up clothes and funky make-up," Watson said. Principal Mary Pat Shepherd said that while parental involvement is important at all schools, student achievement at St. Paul's is indicative of parental dedication. "There is a sense of community and working together," she said. "Parents feel ownership - they're not just paying for it. "They just take a much bigger role in what the child is doing in terms of helping out or assisting in whatever capacity."

Learn more at: Commercial - News


Sunday, January 22, 2006
 
Pharmacy owners should decide what's sold


If you have a moral objection to pornography, are you going work at a magazine stand that sells Playboy and Penthouse? If drinking alcohol is against your religion, will you seek employment at a liquor store? Of course not. On the other hand, if you own your own business, you are perfectly within your rights to refuse to sell racy magazines and beer. If a customer asked where he could get those things, you might even direct him to another shop down the street. For the retail pharmacy business, though, things aren’t quite that simple. Pill-peddlers who are opposed to contraceptives on religious grounds have been refusing to fill prescriptions, with some going so far as to seize the prescription form so the customer can’t get it filled elsewhere. A few states are countering that radical action with what some feel are equally extreme measures. In Illinois, for instance, Gov. Rod Blagojevich imposed a regulation in April that requires pharmacies that sell FDA-approved contraceptives to fill prescriptions for emergency birth control. The penalty for violation could be the loss of license for both the pharmacy and the store’s chief pharmacist. Pharmacies that don’t fill prescriptions for any type of contraceptive are exempt from the rule. The issue has been a simmering kettle since the FDA approved the so-called “morning-after pill,” but it began boiling over again late last month after Walgreen Co. put four pharmacists on unpaid leave for refusing to fill prescriptions, citing moral grounds. The pharmacists have procured an attorney and are considering legal action. Other pharmacists have already sued over the Illinois rule. For many people, the contraceptive issue may seem like splitting hairs. To others, it’s literally a matter of life and death. Like other forms of birth control pill, the emergency contraceptives contain progesterone, estrogen or both, but in a super-high dosage, which is taken within 72 hours of intercourse. The morning-after pill also works somewhat like other contraceptive pills, either by preventing the ovaries from releasing an egg, or by irritating the lining of the womb so an egg, if fertilized, won’t implant there. For anyone who morally objects to any type of contraception, like a staunch Roman Catholic, the morning-after pill would obviously be taboo. But some people who may approve of “regular” birth control pills are opposed to this form of emergency contraception because they equate it with abortion. In a technical sense, this isn’t actually true. The chemical abortion drugs, like Mifepristone (more commonly and ominously known as RU-486), act after implantation has occurred. Considering the way all these drugs work, it seems rather hypocritical to sanction regular birth control pills and anathematize the morning-after pill, but admittedly, there’s a fine line, and the issue can be confusing. What shouldn’t be confusing, however, are rules that dictate the behavior of pharmacists in respect to these pills. Society should find a way to strike a happy medium between the fanatical employee of a chain pharmacy who seizes some poor girl’s prescription, and a state that would force every pharmacist to sell any product the governmental deems acceptable. Because they’re working for someone else rather than self-employed, the pharmacists on the Walgreens payroll are guilty not just of breaking the governor’s rule; they’re also guilty of insubordination. The morning-after pills are legal in this country, and Walgreens has every right to set the ground rules on what drugs are sold at its pharmacies. After all, the convenience store employee must sell beer, even if he thinks drinking it is a sin, and he’ll have to sell a few of those dirty magazines, too. Why should the pharmacist be any different? If a pharmacist can’t abide by Walgreens' policies, he should find a job elsewhere, probably in another state, because the Illinois rule is unduly restrictive – not to pharmacists, necessarily, but to business owners. Although the Walgreens pharmacists should be obliged to follow company policy, companies themselves should be allowed to decide what they do and don’t sell. By the same token, a pharmacist who owns his own drugstore and finds the morning-after pill morally repugnant should have the right to refuse to stock it, even if he sells other types of contraceptives. For that matter, he should be able to refuse to sell a particular brand of cough syrup if he has an objection to the company that manufactures it. However, a pharmacist who won’t sell contraceptives should at least have the courtesy to put up a sign that says so – and, if he chooses, the reason why. Ideally, he might even tell the customers where they can find another pharmacy, though some might consider that information a tacit sanction. As far as seizing the prescription form, that crosses the line into theft. That’s a moral issue, too.


Tahlequah (Okla.) Daily Press



Saturday, January 07, 2006
 
Couple gets state conservation award

In addition to sharing their love for Vermilion County's natural beauty with residents and visitors who rent their canoes and kayaks, the owners of Middle Fork Canoe Outfitters lead the state in conservation. Middle Fork's Gregg and Judy Sacotnik collected kudos last week for their efforts to keep area waterways clean. Lt. Gov. Pat Quinn presented them with the 2005 Environmental Hero Award at Chicago's Shedd Aquarium. The award cited the couple for organizing "150 volunteers to participate in two river cleanups this past spring, removing 20 tons of debris." Mayor Scott Eisenhauer said, "We are extremely proud of the work the Sacotniks have done for our community, and most excited that the state also recognizes their contributions." Twelve other citizens, cities and groups received the awards "in recognition for their commitment to providing and maintaining a healthful environment for this and future generations in Illinois," according to Quinn.

Read more at: The Commercial-News


 


Monday, September 12, 2005
 
Salute ends at Vietnam memorial

DANVILLE - A salute to victims of the Sept. 11 attacks ended at a salute to casualties of the Vietnam War on Sunday. The 9/11 Memorial Ride that began in Tilton ended more than eight hours later at the American Veterans Traveling Tribute, a replica of the Vietnam Memorial Wall of Washington, D.C. The wall will be on display today and dismantled Tuesday morning. Gary and Kim Miller decided Sunday was the day they would make their first long-distance group bike ride. Gary, 45, and Kim, 41, of Westville signed up for the memorial ride, which began at Gutterridge Harley-Davidson/Buell on Georgetown Road and made the complete circuit, which took them to two states, five counties and through 37 towns on a more than 260-mile ride ending at Lincoln Park on Logan Avenue. "We've always wanted to go, but this is our first one," said Kim Miller. "9/11 is the main reason. We wanted to remember." "I think it's a good to do something to make people remember," Gary Miller said. "This is going to be mom and dad time, too," Kim added. "We got the kids where they're supposed to be, and we're gone." Led by a motorcycle-riding sheriff's deputy, 148 motorcycles pulled onto Georgetown Road promptly at 10 a.m. The riders paid $10 per cycle and could designate the fire department they would like their fee to go to. At around 6:20 p.m., the roar of the bikes could be heard by the people visiting the wall replica. Seventy-four bikes pulled onto the pavement at the park, dismounted and made their way to the black, shiny memorial to join the 50 to 60 people who were already making their way along the nearly 380-foot metal wall. Standing guard at the wall was Bob Dickelman, 68, a Navy veteran of Korea and Vietnam. ">The News-Gazette Online: "DANVILLE ? A salute to victims of the Sept. 11 attacks ended at a salute to casualties of the Vietnam War on Sunday. The 9/11 Memorial Ride that began in Tilton ended more than eight hours later at the American Veterans Traveling Tribute, a replica of the Vietnam Memorial Wall of Washington, D.C. The wall will be on display today and dismantled Tuesday morning. Gary and Kim Miller decided Sunday was the day they would make their first long-distance group bike ride. Gary, 45, and Kim, 41, of Westville signed up for the memorial ride, which began at Gutterridge Harley-Davidson/Buell on Georgetown Road and made the complete circuit, which took them to two states, five counties and through 37 towns on a more than 260-mile ride ending at Lincoln Park on Logan Avenue. 'We've always wanted to go, but this is our first one,' said Kim Miller. '9/11 is the main reason. We wanted to remember.' 'I think it's a good to do something to make people remember,' Gary Miller said. 'This is going to be mom and dad time, too,' Kim added. 'We got the kids where they're supposed to be, and we're gone.' Led by a motorcycle-riding sheriff's deputy, 148 motorcycles pulled onto Georgetown Road promptly at 10 a.m. The riders paid $10 per cycle and could designate the fire department they would like their fee to go to. At around 6:20 p.m., the roar of the bikes could be heard by the people visiting the wall replica. Seventy-four bikes pulled onto the pavement at the park, dismounted and made their way to the black, shiny memorial to join the 50 to 60 people who were already making their way along the nearly 380-foot metal wall. Standing guard at the wall was Bob Dickelman, 68, a Navy veteran of Korea and Vietnam. CLICK TO SEE PHOTO

More of the story at... The News-Gazette Online


Thursday, June 30, 2005
 
At River Clean up in BEARDSTOWN
Governor honors hard-working environmentalist with PATH Award. Chad Pregracke's hands-on approach to environmental cleanup, restoration and education inspires others to join the effort. IEPA Bureau of Water Chief Marcia Willhite on behalf of Governor Rod Blagojevich. The presentation was on board the Living Lands and Waters barge that collects refuse while teaching environmental education on Illinois' major rivers. [Attending the workshop and Award presentation was Chris Lawton of St. Paul School, Danville, Illinois. He was with the Prairie Frowers group of the University of Illinois. Mr. Lawton enjoyed an overnight on the barge and was part of the clean up on Saturday.]


Read more of the story at .... State of Illinois Home - Illinois EPA


Monday, June 27, 2005
 
River Sweep by Lisa Conn

On hot summer days most people do what they can to stay out of the hot sun, but not Chad Pregracke. He founded the Living Land and Waters organization 9 years ago because he felt Americas rivers were becoming over run with trash. They spent Saturday cleaning up the river in Beardstown. The Illinois EPA chose Pregracke as this year's recipient of the Public Service Path award for his environmental efforts. They presented him with a plaque before the cleaning began this morning. 'It's a huge honor and we'll just keep cleaning up I never thought it would come to this but it's grown out of neccessity' said Pregracke. Since the group's founding, they've cleared more than 2 million pound of garbage from area rivers.

KHQA News Quincy, IL


Tuesday, April 19, 2005
 
Career Lab at St. Paul's
St. Paul's Grade School seventh-grader Chelsey Robinson uses a hole punch Monday on a leather key chain with the help of career lab worker Bob Ruch at the Vermilion Advantage Career Lab.

Commercial News Online



 
Events in the life of Joseph Ratzinger, Pope Benedict XVI:

April 16, 1927: Born in Marktl am Inn in Germany's southern region of Bavaria near the Austrian border on the day before Easter. Baptized the same day.
1929: Family moves to town of Tittmoning.
1932: Family moves to Traunstein after his father has conflicts with local Nazi Party supporters in Tittmoning.
1941: Enrolled against his will in Hitler Youth. Dismissed shortly afterward because of his intention to study for the priesthood.
1943: Drafted as helper for anti-aircraft unit, serves in battery defending BMW plant.
1944: Dismissed from unit, but returns home to find draft notice for forced labor.
1944: Leaves home to dig anti-tank trenches.
1944: Released from labor force and returns home only to receive army draft notice three weeks later.
1945: Deserts from army and returns home. Captured by Americans as war ends.
1945: Released from U.S. POW camp, hitches a ride home on milk truck.
1945: Begins study for priesthood in Freising.
1951: Ordained a priest along with his brother Georg.
1953: Receives doctorate in theology, University of Munich.
1959: Begins teaching theology in Bonn, first of several appointments in German universities.
1969: Leaves University of Tuebingen concerned about student unrest which had interrupted his lectures with sit-ins. Takes teaching job in Regensburg in native Bavaria, near his brother.
1977: Elected Archbishop of Munich und Freising.
1977: Elevated to cardinal three months later by Pope Paul VI.
1978: Participated in conclave that elected Pope John Paul II.
1979: Vatican revokes theology teaching license of liberal German theologian Hans Kueng, who helped Ratzinger get a teaching post at University of Tuebingen in the 1960s. Ratzinger was sharply critical of Kueng.
1981: Summoned to Rome as head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith under John Paul II.
1985: On behalf of John Paul II, he denounces a work by Leonard Boff, a Latin American pioneer of Liberation Theology.
1985: Publication of "The Ratzinger Report."
1997: Publication of "Salt of the Earth."
1998: Publication of "Milestones. Memoirs: 1927 to 1997."
2000: Publication of "God and World," "Spirit of the Liturgy."
2002: Named Dean of the College of Cardinals.
April 13, 2005: Publication of "Values in a Time of Upheaval."
April 19, 2005: Elected Pope Benedict XVI.

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